Category: Finance & Accounting

How to Cost-Effectively Manage Your Accounting Division?

(Cost Effective cheap accounting in Hounslow)

Competition across the globe has been intensifying at an increasing pace over time. In this regard, businesses in the modern-day and age are more vigilant about their cost centers, to ensure that they are not overspending, and can stay within the desired budget. Speaking of Hounslow, it is a major metropolitan center, and therefore, hosts a large number of businesses. The business trajectory in this area looks promising, which is mirrored in the increasing number of businesses that have established over time. However, with businesses striving to save costs, several ancillary services can be outsourced. This delegation helps the company to save substantial costs and manage their resources much effectively. 

Accounting tends to be one of the most important functions of a business. Given the high degree relevance it holds for the stakeholders of the business, it can be seen that it needs to be taken care of in a proper manner. This can be done either by hiring an expert accountant in this field or by hiring an external company to manage accounting and relevant bookkeeping for the company. With whatever options the company chooses to opt for, there are certain additional strategies they can deploy to save costs, within the function itself. 

  • Cash Discounts and Trade Discounts: From a business perspective, discounts are extremely important as they help the company to accumulate unprecedented income over time. During the normal course of the business, companies can try getting into long term contracts with their suppliers, in exchange for cash discounts. This is mostly done through negotiations and solid networking. 
  • Payroll Processing: Payroll Processing can be regarded as one of the most crucial and time-consuming processes within the accounting division. This can be streamlined using numerous companies that handle HR and other HR-related matters. 
  • Accounts Receivable Management: Debt Factoring tends to be one of the most popular methods of recollection for companies across the world. Organizations across the world use this strategy to maintain their liquidity and reduce the cost of debtors not honoring their commitments. Hiring a specialist for purposes of debtor account management and recovery can often prove to be increasingly costly. Alternatively, companies can sell their debts to other companies, to reduce their inherent risk involved. 
  • Process Automation: Process Automation in accounting has greatly helped companies save substantial costs, and generate reports at a quicker time interval. Using tools, like QuickBooks, and other software, can greatly help business owners to save money, and generate better results without having someone on their payroll do this for them. 

Therefore, it can be seen that cheap accounting in Hounslow, is no longer far-fetched. With proper management of resources and the correct execution strategy, organizations can achieve the desired KPIs (Key Performance Indicators). In most cases, this is achieved by outsourcing the entire division to a specialized company, which covers all aspects of accounting under one roof. 

Accounting In Hounslow

What To Look For When Hiring An Accountant In Hounslow?

Recruiting employees can be one of the most integral functions of any organization. Recruitment is a costly function, and organizations need to consider a number of functions to ensure that they are able to take the right decision in this regard. Even for ancillary departments in a business, like accountancy. It can be seen that recruitment should be considered as an extremely important component. As far as Hounslow is concerned, it has recently seen a surge in new companies being formed. With a subsequent increase in business for ancillary companies. Similar has been the case for accounting companies in the region. However, deciding on the right accounting partner is often a difficult choice to make.

Here are some tips and tricks, which business owners should take into consideration when finalizing their partner for a subsequent year. 

Credentials:

It is extremely important to ensure that business owners are able to account for the credentials of the accounting firm (or individual). They are contracting with. It is important because of the reason that it helps the company to have reasonable assurance that the people taking responsibility for the particular job are experts in their fields. They can ensure that there are no issues pertaining to compliance or other miscellaneous matters. Furthermore, this can also add credibility to their investors or their creditors. Because they would know that the organization is getting their books prepared from a well-reputed company. 

Reviews:

Reviews and recommendations are one of the most reliable and safe methods that can be used for hiring purposes. In the case where the company is looking to hire external companies. It is often a good idea to look for other clientele the company has. This can greatly help the company to make sure they make the right choice and ensure a cordial working relationship. 

Accounting in Hounslow

Industry Experience:

Industry Experience tends to be a very crucial determinant when making a selection for an accountant. This is because different industries have accounting and bookkeeping of a different nature. Therefore, it is always an advantage to hiring an accountant who can have relevant experience. So that there are lesser chances of any errors. 

Flexibility:

Businesses these days are opting for flexibility across all their business operations. Hiring an individual, and carry out a number of functions for the company is often a good idea in this regard.  Alternatively, hiring external accountants who can provide flexibility with payments, and other related services (like invoicing), can also help the company save costs, and avail a larger pool of services.

The factors mentioned above are some of the most important factors which should be considered by companies hiring accountants in Hounslow, and all across the world. These factors can greatly help companies make an informed decision about the contract they are signing so that they are able to extrapolate a greater service protocol, which can be reflected in their well-kept books, and accounting systems. 

cheap accounting hounslow

How to Cost-Effectively Manage your Accounting Division?

cheap accounting Hounslow: Competition across the globe has been intensifying at an increasing pace over the course of time. In this regard, businesses in the modern-day and age are more vigilant about their cost centers. In order to ensure that they are not overspending, and are able to stay within the desired budget. Speaking of Hounslow, it is a major metropolitan center, and therefore, hosts a large number of businesses. The business trajectory in this area looks promising, which is evidently mirrored in the increasing number of businesses that have established over the course of time. However, businesses striving to save costs. There are a number of ancillary services that can outsource. This delegation helps the company to save substantial costs and manage their resources much effectively. 

Accounting tends to be one of the most important functions of a business. Given the high degree relevance it holds for the stakeholders of the business, So it needs to be taken care of in a proper manner. This can be done either by hiring an expert accountant in this field or by hiring an external company to manage accounting and relevant bookkeeping for the company. With whatever options the company chooses to opt for. There are certain additional strategies they can deploy in order to save costs.

cheap accounting hounslow

Cash Discounts and Trade Discounts:

From a business perspective, discounts are extremely important as they help the company to accumulate unprecedented income over the course of time. During the normal course of the business. Companies can try getting into long term contracts with their suppliers, in exchange for cash discounts. This is mostly done through negotiations and solid networking. 

Payroll Processing:

Payroll Processing is one of the most crucial and time-consuming processes within the accounting division. It becomes by using numerous companies that handle HR and other HR-related matters.

Accounts Receivable Management:

Debt Factoring tends to be one of the most popular methods of recollection for companies across the world. Organizations across the world use this strategy to maintain their liquidity. And reduce the cost of debtors not honoring their commitments. Hiring a specialist for purposes of debtor account management and recovery can often prove to be increasingly costly. Alternatively, companies can sell their debts to other companies, to reduce their inherent risk involved. 

Process Automation:

 

Process Automation in accounting has greatly helped companies save substantial costs, and generate reports at a quicker time interval. Using tools, like QuickBooks, and other software, can greatly help business owners to save money, and generate better results without having someone on their payroll do this for them. 

Therefore, cheap accounting in Hounslow is no longer far-fetch. With proper management of resources and the correct execution strategy, organizations can achieve the desired KPIs (Key Performance Indicators). In most cases, this achieves by outsourcing the entire division to a specialized company, which covers all aspects of accounting under one roof.

It is easy to fall into the trap of assuming that legal and professional costs can be computed in calculating taxable profits if they are incurred wholly and exclusively for the purposes of the business; however this is only part of the story.  

Legal and professional fees – Capital or revenue?

At some point, a landlord is likely to incur legal and professional fees in connection with the running of their property rental business. It is easy to fall into the trap of assuming that these costs can be computed in calculating taxable profits if they are incurred wholly and exclusively for the purposes of the business; however this is only part of the story. The landlord must also determine whether the costs are revenue or capital in nature. The rules also differ depending upon whether the accounts are prepared on the cash basis or using traditional accounting under the accruals basis.

The rule

The nature of the legal fees follow that of the matter to which they relate – so if the fees are incurred in relation to an item which is itself revenue in nature, the legal and professional fees are also revenue in nature. Likewise, legal fees that are incurred in connection with a matter that is capital in nature are also capital in nature.
Legal fees that are revenue in nature would include, for example, fees incurred to recover unpaid rent, while legal fees that are capital in nature would include fees incurred in connection with the purchase of a property.

Cash or accruals basis

Revenue items are deductible in computing profits regardless of whether they are prepared under the cash or accruals basis, although the time at which the relief is given will differ. Under the cash basis, the deduction is given for the period to which the expenditure relates, for the cash basis the deduction is given for the period for which the expenditure is incurred.
For capital expenditure different rules apply. No deduction is allowed for capital expenditure under the accrual basis, whereas under the cash basis, the treatment depends on the nature of the item – capital expenditure is deductible under the cash basis unless the expenditure is of a type for which a deduction is expressly forbidden. Items of the forbidden list include expenditure in or in connection with lease premiums and the provision, alteration or disposal of land (which includes property).

Example of allowable revenue items

A deduction for legal and professional fees will normally be allowed where they relate to:
• costs of obtaining a valuation
• normal accountancy costs incurred in preparing accounts of the rental business and agreeing the tax liabilities
• costs of arbitration to determine the rent
• the costs of evicting an unsatisfactory tenant to re-let the property

Example of capital expenses

The following are examples of legal and professional fees which are capital in nature:
• legal costs incurred in acquiring or adding to a property
• costs in connection with negotiations under the Town and Country Planning Act
• fees incurred in pursuing debts of a capital nature, such as the proceeds due on sale

Leases

Leases can be tricky. The expenses incurred in connection with the first letting or subletting for more than one year are deemed to be capital and therefore not deductible – this would include the legal fees incurred in drawing up the lease, surveyors’ fees and commission. However, if the lease is for less than one year, the associated expenses can be deducted. Normal legal and professional fees on the renewal of a lease are also deductible if the lease is for less than 50 years; although any proportion of the fees that relate to the payment of a premium are not deductible.
If a new lease closely follows the previous lease, a change of tenant will not render the associated fees non-deductible. However, if the property is put to other use between lets, or a long lease, say, replaces a short lease, the associated costs will be capital and non-deductible.

Partner note: HMRC’s Property Income Manual PIM 2120

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The last thing you want for Christmas is an inheritance tax liability! Read this blog to make sure you don’t get caught.

Beware of triggering an IHT bill on Christmas gifts

When deciding what to give as Christmas gifts, the possibility of triggering an unintended inheritance tax liability is not one that immediately springs to mind. However, there are traps that may catch the unwary.

Income or capital

When making a gift, it is important to ascertain whether the gift is being made out of income or from capital. There is an inheritance tax exemption for normal expenditure from income. To qualify, the gift must be made regularly and only from surplus income. It is important that after making the gift you have sufficient income left to maintain your usual lifestyle. To avoid unwanted questions, it is a good idea to set up a regular pattern of giving and keep records to show that the gifts were made from income.

A gift that is made from capital – for example, from the proceeds from the sale of a property or a gift of a valuable antique – will reduce the value of the estate. Unless the gift falls within the ambit of another exemption, the gift will be a potentially exempt transfer (PET) and will be taken into account in working out the inheritance tax due on the estate if you die within seven years of making the gift.

Gifts to spouses and civil partners

The inter-spouse exemption protects gifts between spouses and civil partners. Consequently, gifts of any value can be given to a spouse or civil partner without worrying about the inheritance tax implications.

Annual allowance

Everyone has an annual allowance for inheritance tax purposes of £3,000. The annual allowance enables you to give away £3,000 every year in assets or cash, in addition to gifts covered by other exemptions, without it being added to the value of your estate.

You can also carry forward the annual exemption to the following year if it is not used, so if you did not use it in the last tax year, you can make gifts of up to £6,000 this year without having to worry about inheritance tax. However, any unused allowance can only be carried forward to the following tax year, after which it is lost.

Small gifts

The small gifts exemption enables you to make gifts of up to £250 a year to as many people as you like without having to keep a tally for inheritance tax purposes. However, the same person cannot benefit from a small gift of £250 in addition to the annual gifts allowance.

Wedding gifts

If a family wedding is on the horizon, you can take advantage of the wedding gifts exemption to make further gifts. To qualify, the gifts must be made before the wedding not afterwards. The exempt amounts are set at £5,000 for gifts to a child, £2,500 for gifts to a grandchild or great-grandchild and at £1,000 for a gift to another relative.

Partner note: IHTA 1984, ss. 18 – 22.

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It can pay off to keep track of your business mileage you incur for your rental properties – here’s why.

Using your car in your property rental business

Landlords will often use their car for the purposes of their property rental business. Where they do so, they are able to claim a deduction for the costs that they incur.

Using mileage rates

Where a landlord uses their car for business purposes, the easiest way to work out the amount that can be deducted is to make use of the simplified expenses system and use the relevant mileage rates to claim a deduction based on the business mileage undertaken.

For cars (and also vans) the rate is set at 45p per mile for the first 10,000 business miles in the tax year and at 25p per mile for any subsequent business mileage.

Example

Karen is an unincorporated landlord and has three properties that she lets out. During the tax year, she undertakes 712 business miles in her own car in respect of her property business.

She claims a deduction of 45p per mile, a total deduction for the year of £320.40.

Deduction based on actual costs

The use of simplified expenses, while generally easier from an administration perspective, is not compulsory. The landlord can instead claim a deduction based on the actual costs. However, in practice this will be time consuming. Further, where the car is used for both business and private travel, a deduction is only permitted for the business element. Separating actual costs between business and private travel can be very time consuming and will only be worthwhile where it gives rise to a significantly higher deduction than that obtained by using the mileage rates.

Capital allowances

Capital allowances cannot be claimed where mileage allowances are claimed. Where a deduction is based on actual costs, capital allowances can be claimed in respect of the car. However, the claim must be adjusted to reflect any private use. So, for example, if a car is used for the purposes of the property business 20% of the time and for private use 80% of the claim, any capital allowance claim must be restricted to 20%.

Other travel

The costs of travel on public transport or by taxi can be deducted in computing the profits of the property rental business to the extent that it constitutes business travel for the purposes of that business.

Partner note: ITTOIA 2005, s. 94D

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Joint tenants v tenants in common – Which you choose will depend on whether you’d like flexibility in allocating property income, and how you want your property to be passed on.

Joint tenants v tenants in common – Does it matter?

There are two different ways of owning property jointly – as joint tenants or as tenants in common. The way in which the property is owned determines exactly who owns what and also what happens when one of the joint owners dies and how any income is taxed.

Joint tenants

Where two or more owners own a property as joint tenants, they jointly own the whole property rather than owning individual shares. Each owner has equal rights to the whole property. When one of the joint owners dies, the remaining joint owners own the whole property. The deceased is not able to pass his or her share on to someone else.

Example

Helen and Harry are married and own their family home as joint tenants. The couple have three children. If, for example, Harry dies first, his share of the property automatically passes to Helen. Harry cannot leave his share of the property to his children.

Where a property that is owned as joint tenants is rented out, the income is treated as arising in equal shares as all owners have an equal stake in the property. For spouses and civil partners this is the default position; however, there is no possibility of making a Form 17 election (see below) as the property owned as joint tenants can only be owned equally.

Tenants in common

Tenants in common own individual shares in the property and have more flexibility than joint tenants as to what they do with their stake in the property. On death, their stake does not automatically go to the other joint owners; rather it will follow the provisions of the will (or, if there is no will, the intestacy provisions).

It will be beneficial to own property as tenants in common if you want to leave your share of the property to someone other than the other joint owner.

Example

Jack and Jane are married. Each have children from previous relationships. They own a holiday cottage as tenants in common. In their wills, they have each made provision for their share to pass to their own children.

Where the property is let out, owing the property as tenants in common provides more flexibility as to how the income is allocated for tax purposes. Where the joint owners are spouses or civil partners, the income is treated as arising equally. However, where the actual beneficial ownership is unequal, they can elect (on Form 17) for the income to be taxed in accordance to their ownership shares where this is beneficial. If the tenants in common are not married or in a civil partnership, the income is taxed by reference to their actual stake in the property.

Changing ownership status

It is relatively easy to change the type of ownership, for example, if the property is owned as joint tenants it may be desirable to own it as tenants in common to enable each owner to leave their share to someone else. A property can also be changed from sole ownership to joint ownership – ether as tenants in common or joint tenants.

Partner note: Law of Property Act 1925, ss. 34, 36;. ITA 2007 ss. 836. 837.

 

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The delayed start date for the domestic reverse VAT charge has given businesses an extra year to prepare for the charge. We explain what you can do to prepare.

Domestic reverse VAT charge for building and construction services

The domestic reverse VAT charge for building and construction services was due to come into effect from 1 October 2019. However, in early September it was announced that the start date had been put back one year. As a result, the charge will now apply from 1 October 2020.

Who is affected?

The charge will affect individuals and businesses who are registered for VAT in the UK and who supply or receive specified services that are reported under the Construction Industry Scheme (CIS).

Nature of a reverse charge

The reverse charge means that the customer receiving the specified supply has to pay the VAT rather than the supplier. In turn, the customer can recover the VAT under the normal VAT recovery rules.

Supplies within the scope of the charge

The reverse charge will apply to supplies of building and construction services which are supplied at the standard or reduced rates that also need to be reported under the CIS. These are called specified supplies.

However, where materials are included within a service, the reverse charge applies to the whole amount. By contrast, where deductions are made from payments to subcontractors under the CIS, no deductions are made from any part of the payment that relates to material.

Move to monthly returns

The introduction of the reverse charge will mean that some businesses may become repayment traders claiming VAT back from HMRC rather than paying it over to HMRC. To aid cashflow and reduce the delay in claiming the VAT back, repayment traders can move to monthly returns.

Planning ahead

The delayed start date has given businesses an extra year to prepare for the charge. In order to be ready for its introduction, businesses within the CIS should:

  • check whether the reverse charge will affect their sales, their purchases or both
  • update their accounting systems and software to deal with the reverse charge from 1 October 2020
  • consider whether the change will impact on cashflow
  • ensure that staff who are responsible for VAT accounting are familiar with the reverse charge and how it will operate

Contractors should review their contracts with subcontractors to determine whether the reverse charge will apply to services received under the contract. Where it does, they will need to notify their suppliers.

Subcontractors will need to contact their customers to obtain confirmation from them as to whether the reverse charge will apply, and also whether the customer is an end user or intermediary supplier.

Impact of change of start date

HMRC recognise that the start date was changed at short notice and that businesses may have changed their invoices to meet the needs of the reverse charge and cannot easily change them back. Where errors arise as a result, HMRC will take the change of date into account.

Partner Note: The Value Added Tax (Section 55A) (Specified Services and Excepted Supplies) Order 2019 (SI 2019/892); The Value Added Tax (Section 55A) (Specified Services and Excepted Supplies) (Change of Commencement Day) Order 2019 (Si 2019/1240).

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Wondering whether to use dividends or a salary? Read this blog to find out why dividends are more cost-effective.

Director’s salary or bonus?

Given current tax rates, paying a dividend rather than a salary will often be a more cost-effective way of withdrawing profits from a company.

Tax is currently payable on any dividend income received over the £2,000 annual dividend allowance at the following rates:

  • 7.5% on dividend income within the basic rate band (up to £37,500 in 2019-20)
  • 32.5% on dividend income within the higher rate band (£37,501 to £150,000 in 2019-20)
  • 38.1% on dividend income within the additional rate band (over £150,000 in 2019-20)

However, if the company is loss-making and has no retained profits, it will not be possible to declare a dividend, and an alternative will need to be considered. This often involves an increased salary or a one-off bonus payment.  

From a tax perspective, the position will be the same whether a salary or bonus is paid. Both types of payment attract income tax at the recipient’s relevant rate of tax (20%, 40% or 45% as appropriate).

However, from a National Insurance Contributions (NICs) perspective, the position, and any potential cost savings, will depend on whether or not the payment is made to a director.

Directors have an annual earnings period for NIC purposes. Broadly, this means that NICs payable will be the same regardless of whether the payment is made in regular instalments or as a single lump sum bonus.  In addition, since there is no upper limit of employer (secondary) NICs, the company’s position will be the same regardless of whether the payment is made by way of a salary or a bonus.

Where a bonus or salary payment is to be made to another family member who is not a director, the earnings period rules mean that it may be possible to save employees’ NICs by paying a one-off bonus rather than a regular salary.

Example

Henry is the sole director of a company and an equal 50% shareholder with his wife Susan. In 2019/20 they each receive a salary of £720 per month.

In the year ended 31 March 2020, the company makes profits of £24,000 (after paying the salaries). The profits are to be shared equally between Henry and Susan. They want to know whether it will be more cost effective to extract the profits as an additional salary – each receiving an additional £1,000 per month for the next twelve months – or as a one-off bonus payment with each receiving £12,000.

The income tax position will be the same regardless of which method is used.

As Henry is a director, his NIC position will be the same regardless of which route is taken as he has an annual earnings period for NIC purposes.

Susan is not a director, so the normal earnings period for NIC in a month will be the interval in which her existing salary is paid.

Assuming NIC rates and thresholds remain the same in 2020/21, if Susan receives an additional salary of £1,000 a month, she will pay Class 1 NIC of £120 (£1,000 x 12%) a month on that additional salary. Her annual NIC bill on the additional salary of £12,000 will be £1,440.

However, if she receives a lump sum bonus of £12,000 in one month (in addition to her normal monthly salary of £720), she will pay NIC on the bonus of £585 ((£3,450 x 12%) + (£8,550 x 2%)).

Paying a bonus instead of a salary reduces Susan’s NIC bill by £855.

Finally, it is important to note that in determining an effective company profit extraction strategy, tax should never be the only consideration. Any profit extraction strategy should be consistent with the wider goals and aims of the company.

Partner note: SI 2001/1004, Reg 11

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Do you avoid these five common mistakes when you’re computing your business profits?

Avoiding common errors when computing business profits

HMRC produce a range of Toolkits for agents, which highlight errors commonly made in returns so that agents can take steps to avoid them. The business profits toolkit provides guidance on errors that are found in relation to business profits for small and medium-sized businesses. They are helpful to anyone computing taxable business profits.

Risk area 1 – Record keeping

Good record-keeping is essential for business profits to be calculated correctly. Poor records may result in sales or allowable expenditure being omitted from the accounts, with the result that the level of profit or loss is incorrect.

Risk area 2 – Business income

The profit or loss will only be correct if all income is included in the accounts. Unless the business is an unincorporated business that has opted to use the cash basis, business income should be included on an accruals basis, matching the income to the period in which it was earned.

Not all sources of business income will be immediately obvious – the income of the business may, for example, include scrap sales, contra sales or barter arrangements. Cash sales may also be overlooked.

Risk area 3 – Expenditure

To ensure that the profit is not overstated, all allowable expenditure should be taken into account. However, a deduction is only permitted for expenses which are wholly and exclusively incurred for the purposes of the business. Attention should also be paid to specific prohibitions, such as for business entertaining.

Purchases and expenses should be reviewed to ensure that they have been included.

Sole traders and partnerships comprising individuals can use simplified expenses rather than claiming actual expenses.

Risk area 4 – Stock and work in progress

Where the business is one that holds stock, care must be taken to include it at the correct value – this is the lower of cost and net realisable value. Errors will arise if stock is overlooked or valued incorrectly.

Work-in-progress can be a complex area and advice should be taken to ensure that the treatment is correct.

Risk area 5 – Miscellaneous items

Miscellaneous areas should also be considered. These may include a review of post-balance sheet events and consideration as to whether any adjustment to the accounts is required. Staff costs should also be reviewed and amounts unpaid nine months after the end of the period should be added back. As far as directors are concerned, consideration should be given to the date on which amounts are credited to the director’s loan account.

Partner note: HMRC’s Business Profits Toolkit – see www.gov.uk/government/publications/hmrc-business-profits-toolkit.

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